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Lobelia • Skunk Cabbage


Lobelia

LOBELIA • SKUNK CABBAGE
COMPOUND

Antispasmodic Tincture

A blend of the liquid extracts of:

• Lobelia herb & seed (Lobelia inflata) 18%
• Skunk Cabbage rhizome & root (Symplocarpus foetidus) 18%
* Skullcap flowering herb (Scutellaria lateriflora) 18%
• Black Cohosh rhizome & root (Cimicifuga racemosa) 18%
• Myrrh tears (Commiphora abyssinica &/or molmol) 18%
• Cayenne pepper (Capsicum annuum) 10%

* Fresh • Dried

History: Antispasmodic Tincture is a tried and true remedy in American traditional herbal medicine. It was made famous by the renowned American herbalist, Jethro Kloss, in his classic American herbal, Back To Eden, which was first published in 1939.

Action: This compound is both a strong, relaxing antispasmodic, and a powerful diffusive stimulant. It acts to relieve muscular and visceral tensions in the body while vitalizing and equalizing the neurological force and the circulation of the blood and body fluids.

Uses: In Back To Eden Jethro Kloss recommended Antispasmodic Tincture for the following conditions: asthma, whooping cough, spasmodic croup, cramps, spasms, convulsions, epilepsy, suspended animation, hysteria, fainting, delirium tremens, childbirth, hydrophobia, and lockjaw. He also advised: “Apply externally to any kind of swelling, cramps; is very beneficial in rheumatism, lumbago, etc.” It is the authors personal opinion that this compound could possibly be useful in moderating the neurological symptoms of multiple sclerosis or Parkinson’s disease.

Dose: Preventative or restorative tonic: Two to three times per day, take 15 to 30 drops in water.*
Acute: Three to five times per day, take 20 to 40 drops in water.*
The following information is given by Jethro Kloss in his famous herbal, Back To Eden.

“We have given just a drop or two on the tip of the finger, thrusting the finger into the mouth of a baby in convulsions, and in less time than it takes to write this statement the convulsions have ceased.”
“Dr. H. Nowell has poured a teaspoonful of the antispasmodic tincture, full strength, between the clenched teeth of a case of lockjaw and before a second teaspoonful could be poured from the bottle the locked jaws have relaxed.”

“... in the case of infants, it should be rubbed well into the neck, chest, and between the shoulders at the same time. Two or three drops of the tincture in a raw state should be placed in the mouth and washed down with teaspoonful doses of warm water and the patient kept warm in bed. In all such cases relief will be experienced in a few minutes, and by repeating the same treatment every one or two hours a cure will soon be effected and the patient brought to a state of convalescence.”

Cautions: Consult a qualified midwife or physician before taking during pregnancy. * Because of the Lobelia in this compound, large and frequent doses may induce nausea or vomiting in some sensitive individuals. If this happens, discontinue use for 24 hours, and then resume use with a lower number of drops. Drops can be adjusted according to tolerance.

This compound is contraindicated for asthenic individuals with low vitality and a weak constitution, and in cases of low blood pressure.

Many of the maladies listed above can often be serious health problems or even life-threatening. Anyone suffering from any of these maladies should be treated by a qualified healthcare practitioner.



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This information is for educational and research purposes only. It is not intended to medically prescribe or promote the sale of any product, nor is it intended to replace qualified medical healthcare. If you have, or think you have a condition which requires medical attention, you should promptly seek qualified healthcare.

 

 

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